Inspired by the Tunisian example, Egyptians take to the streets in their own protest. Al Jazeera’s Alaa Bayoumi asks: But can it last?

The traditional wisdom has always been that Egyptians don’t revolt simply because they are an agricultural society. Farmers require stability and patience to tend their land. Farmers also need a strong central government to protect them against natural disasters, such as floods and droughts. Egypt is no longer an agricultural society.

But since the 1952 military led revolution which ended monarchism in Egypt, the country has been ruled by semi-authoritarian national regimes that used the resources of the state, large security apparatuses and a centralised economy led by a gigantic public sector, to suppress political opposition, buy public satisfaction, and build legitimacy for its economically inefficient and politically oppressive government.

Click here for the article.